Professor John Studd

Founder and Vice-President of the National Osteoporosis Society & Council. Member of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Past-President of the Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Royal Society of Medicine. Chairman of the British Menopause Society 2005-2007.

He was Consultant Gynaecologist in Salisbury, Rhodesia and Consultant and Senior Lecturer at the University of Nottingham and moved to London in 1974 as Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist at King's College Hospital. Prof Studd was later Consultant Gynaecologist at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, London and also Professor of Gynaecology at Imperial College. He now runs the London PMS & Menopause Centre

Prof Studd has a D.Sc. for 25 years of published work on oestrogen therapy in women. He has written more than 500 scientific articles and written or edited more than 25 postgraduate books on gynaecology.

Prof Studd is internationally recognised as one of the world’s most authoritative and experienced gynaecologists. He has championed the use of hormone implants for women with osteoporosis or with severe depressive or sexual problems after the menopause and as an almost routine route of HRT after hysterectomy.

Prof Studd started the first ever menopause clinic in the county. This hormone treatment for the menopause was so controversial at the time that the clinic was closed down for three months following protests from the BMA. However, the optimism placed in HRT has been confirmed and Prof Studd has continued to work on specific treatments for menopausal symptoms. He pioneered the sequential oestrogen/progestogen treatment and also the continuous combined oestrogen/progestogen non-bleeding treatment. He has championed the use of hormone implants for women with osteoporosis or with severe depressive or sexual problems after the menopause and as an almost routine route of HRT after hysterectomy.

He first described the use of oestrogen patches and oestrogen implants for the treatment of severe PMS, postnatal depression and perimenopausal depression.

He feels strongly that women are not always given the best medical advice around the use of hormones as doctors often do not understand the intricacies of route, dose, combination with testosterone and the varied indications.

He says that he realises that he needs to write a text book for the public. "This is much more challenging, but the following articles for Total Health are an excellent starting point."

In 2009 he was awarded the Blair Bell gold medal of the Royal Society of Medicine which is given every 5 years to the gynaecologist who has made the biggest lifetime contribution to the specialty.

See Consultant Profile