Mr Ertan Saridogan, Consultant Gynaecologist

Ertan Saridogan is a Consultant in Gynaecology, Reproductive Medicine and Minimal Access Surgery at the University College London Hospitals (UCLH) and The Portland Hospital. He qualified in 1997 from Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

He is currently the Lead Clinician and Person Responsible for the Reproductive Medicine Unit at the UCLH. His current clinical interests include laparoscopicA keyhole surgical procedure. and hysteroscopic surgery, particularly for patients with subfertility, endometriosisA condition in which tissue that normally lines the uterus (womb) of a woman is found outside the uterus or in other parts of the body. and outpatient hysteroscopyExamination of the inside of the uterus by endoscopy, using an instrument called a hysteroscope inserted through the vagina and cervix.. His research interests include healthy and diseased fallopian tubeOne of two tubes in the female body that connect the ovaries to the uterus. function, and cellular and biochemical mechanisms in endometriosis associated infertility.

Personal treatment philosophy: I am a believer in the philosophy of ‘patient-centred’ practice, I believe in enabling women to decide on their own management plan.

Articles: 
  • Medical treatments for uterine fibroids

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    Uterine fibroidsBenign tumours, most often in the uterus. are common, and are found in up to 70–80% of women by the time they reach the menopauseThe time of a woman’s life when her ovaries stop releasing an egg (ovum) on a monthly cycle.. Their prevalence increases with age, from approximately 20% of women at the age of 20 years to 35–60% at the age of 35 years. Fortunately, the majority of the fibroids are harmless and only half of them are considered ‘significant’. Due to the high prevalence of fibroids a large number of treatment options are available. These include surgical removal of fibroids (myomectomy), uterine arteryA blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart. Apart from the pulmonary artery and umbilical artery, all arteries carry oxygenated blood. embolisation (an angiographyX-ray imaging of the blood vessels following the injection of a dye to improve visibility. procedure, which blocks the bloodA fluid that transports oxygen and other substances through the body, made up of blood cells suspended in a liquid. supply to the fibroids causing them to shrink), high frequencyApplied to urination, needing to urinate more often than normal, for whatever reason. ultrasoundA diagnostic method in which very high frequency sound waves are passed into the body and the reflective echoes analysed to build a picture of the internal organs – or of the foetus in the uterus. treatment and hysterectomyThe surgical removal of the uterus (womb)..
  • The causes of irregular and heavy periods

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    Irregularity and heaviness of periods may be due to a number of causes including fibroidsBenign tumours, most often in the uterus. (non-cancerousMalignant, a tumour that may invade surrounding tissues or spread to distant parts of the body. growths) of the wombThe uterus., polypsGrowths on the surface of a mucous membrane (a surface that secretes mucous), lining any body cavity that opens to the outside of the body. (abnormal growth of tissueA group of cells with a similar structure and a specialised function. from the lining of the womb), thickening of the lining of the womb (hyperplasia), adenomyosis of the womb (non-cancerous condition of the womb that often mimics the symptoms of fibroids), bleeding or clotting problems, bloodA fluid that transports oxygen and other substances through the body, made up of blood cells suspended in a liquid. thinning medication, hormonal imbalance or, very rarely, cancer of the womb or of the neck of the womb (cervixAny neck-like structure; most commonly refers to the neck of the uterus.).

  • Irregular and Heavy Periods

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    Irregular and heavy periods are amongst the most common gynaecological problems that trouble women during their childbearing years.  Published studies report that between 4% and 50% women suffer from heavy periods; this large variation is probably due to cultural differences and the way that ‘heavy periods’ are defined or measured. However, it is likely that approximately one in eight to ten women experience heavy periods.

  • Medical investigations and treatment for irregular and heavy periods

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    When a woman with heavy and/or irregular periods sees a doctor the first step will be the taking of a detailed medical history. Important aspects in the history are age, the duration of the problem, the length of the cycles and duration of bleeding, whether there are associated symptoms such as pain, whether contraceptives or precautions are used to prevent pregnancythe period from conception to birth, the history of smear tests and the possibility of pregnancy. 

  • Endometriosis: Latest treatment options

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    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of tissueA group of cells with a similar structure and a specialised function. or cells from the lining of the wombThe uterus. (endometriumThe layer of tissue lining the uterus.) elsewhere in the body. It is most commonly found around the uterusThe womb, where embryo implantation occurs and the growing foetus is nourished. and ovariesFemale reproductive organs situated one on either side of the uterus (womb). They produce egg cells (ova) and hormones in a monthly cycle., but it can be located anywhere in the body except the spleenAn organ situated on the left side of the abdomen that filters out worn-out red blood cells and other foreign bodies from the bloodstream.. In the ovary endometriosisA condition in which tissue that normally lines the uterus (womb) of a woman is found outside the uterus or in other parts of the body. can form cysts containing old bloodA fluid that transports oxygen and other substances through the body, made up of blood cells suspended in a liquid., also known as chocolate cysts (endometriomaA cyst that is formed when endometrial tissue, the membrane that makes up the inner layer of the uterine wall, grows in the ovaries. ) due to the colour of the contents. When it is in the pelvisThe bony basin formed by the hip bones and the lower vertebrae of the spine; also refers to the lower part of the abdomen. it may affect the bowelA common name for the large and/or small intestines. and the urinary tractThe channels that carry urine from the kidneys to the outside of the body. (bladderThe organ that stores urine. and kidneys). Occasionally it is found in the navel or operation scars. When the tissue from the lining of uterus is found in the muscleTissue made up of cells that can contract to bring about movement. layer of the uterus it is called adenomyosis. Sometimes endometriosis and adenomyosis can be found together in the same woman.

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