Dr Andrew Gaya, Consultant Clinical Oncologist

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, The Harley Street Clinic

Dr Andrew Gaya consultts at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and The Harley Street Clinic.

Dr Gaya qualified at St George’s Hospital Medical School (University of London) where he was awarded a distinction and several academic prizes. He trained in Clinical Oncology at Imperial College and St Bartholomew’s Hospital and subsequently undertook a Cancer Research UK MD Fellowship at University College London. 

Dr Gaya treats solid tumours using chemotherapyThe use of chemical substances to treat disease, particularly cancer., radiotherapyThe treatment of disease using radiation., and biological therapiesA group of therapies that interfere with specific parts of the inflammation process. (Called 'biologic therapies' in American English.) - his main focus is on colorectal cancerAbnormal, uncontrolled cell division resulting in a malignant tumour that may invade surrounding tissues or spread to distant parts of the body., cancers of the oesophagusThe gullet, the part of the gastrointestinal system that extends down from the mouth cavity to the stomach., stomachthe organ or the body where food is stored and broken down, pancreasA gland behind the stomach that produces digestive enzymes and the hormones insulin and glucagon, which together regulate glucose levels in the blood., liverA large abdominal organ that has many important roles including the production of bile and clotting factors, detoxification, and the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates and fats., lung and prostateA gland that surrounds the urethra near the bladder. It produces a fluid that forms part of the semen. cancer. He can treat all cancers treatable by CyberKnife®.

Dr Gaya’s main research interests are functional cancer imaging, where he is looking for ways to assess response to treatment much earlier, and techniques for assessing bloodA fluid that transports oxygen and other substances through the body, made up of blood cells suspended in a liquid. flow and oxygen levels within cancers. He is also interested in developing drug treatments that can cut off the blood supply to cancers, or stop cancers making new blood vessels.

He is heavily involved with the implementation of the latest radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT, IGRT and Tomotherapy, combining targeted or anti-vascularRelating to blood vessels. drugs with radiotherapy, and stereotactic body radiosurgery. He is one of the first UK doctors to use CyberKnife® robotic radiosurgery. He has published widely in peer-reviewed journals, and is currently lead clinical oncologistA specialist in the treatment of cancer. for audit and clinical governance at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust. He is a principle investigator on a number of national and international clinical trials.

Articles: 
  • CyberKnife® FAQs

    By Contact

    The CyberKnife® System is a robotic radiosurgery instrument that is revolutionising the way cancers are treated. It was developed by John Adler, a neurosurgeon from Stanford University in the 1990’s as a way of extending radiosurgery from the head to include the rest of the body. CyberKnife® is in clinical use throughout the world with over 100,000 patient treatments conducted.

  • CyberKnife® Robotic Radiosurgery

    By Contact

    The CyberKnife® System is a robotic radiosurgery instrument that is revolutionising the way some cancers are treated. It was developed by John Adler, a neurosurgeon from Stanford University in the 1990's as a way of extending radiosurgery from the head and brain to include the rest of the body. He went on to found Accuray Incorporated, manufacturers of the CyberKnife® System. CyberKnife® is in clinical use throughout the world with over 60,000 patient treatments conducted. There are currently three units in the UK, and over 300 worldwide.

Videos: 
  • See video

    CyberKnife® - Revolutionising cancer treatment

    Mr Andrew Gaya, Consultant Clinical Oncologist at the London CyberKnife Centre, believes that the technology that enables him to perform robotic radiosurgery has brought about a revolution in the way that cancerAbnormal, uncontrolled cell division resulting in a malignant tumour that may invade surrounding tissues or spread to distant parts of the body. can be treated. The CyberKnife® system allows tumours to be targeted with hundreds of pencil-thin beams of radiationEnergy in the form of waves or particles, including radio waves, X-rays and gamma rays. that are delivered with sub-millimetre accuracy. This means that it is now possible to treat tumours that were previously considered untreatable. He says, “Most advances in cancer treatment are small steps forward, but occasionally there is a giant leap.”

    To watch Mr Gaya discussing one patient’s CyberKnife® story please click here.

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