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calcaneus

The heel bone.

laxity

How relaxed or slack a body part is.

chondral defect

A defect in the cartilage at the ends of bones.

cardiac electrophysiology

Caring for patients with heart rhythm disorders, palpitations, blackouts and patients potentially at high risk of dying suddenly due to cardiac arrest.

catheter ablation

a treatment for atrial fibrillation using catheters inside the heart to ablate tissue using a laser guided by a camera.

Osteolysis

inflammatory response that destroys the bone

spectroscopic

An optical device for producing and observing a spectrum of light or radiation from any source.

nanoparticle

A microscopic particle of matter that is measured on the nanoscale, usually one that measures less than 100 nanometers.

kyphosis

an outward curvature of the spine associated with hunching of the back

Osteoblasts

Cells responsible for bone formation

osteoclasts

large cells that absorb bone tissue

osteopenia

A  condition in which the protein and mineral content of bone tissue is reduced, but less severely than in osteoporosis.

orthorexia

An eating disorder characterised by extreme or excessive preoccupation with eating food believed to be healthy.

pathogen

  A bacterium, virus, or other microorganism that can cause disease.

Sentinel event

Sentinel events are defined by the The Joint Commission (TJC) in the USA as, "any unanticipated event in a healthcare setting resulting in death or serious physical or psychological injury to a patient or patients, not related to the natural course of the patient's illness. Sentinel events specifically include loss of a limb or gross motor function, and any event for which a recurrence would carry a risk of a serious adverse outcome."

These events include, "unexpected occurrences involving death or serious physical or psychological injury, or the risk thereof" and all of the following, even if the outcome was not death or major permanent loss of function:

  • Infant abduction, or discharge to the wrong family.
  • Unexpected death of a full-term infant.
  • Severe neonatal jaundice (bilirubin over 30 milligrams/deciliter).
  • Surgery on the wrong individual or wrong body part.
  • Instrument or object left in a patient after surgery or another procedure.
  • Rape in an acute-care setting.
  • Suicide in an acute-care setting, or within 72 hours of discharge.
  • Haemolytic transfusion reaction due to blood group incompatibilities.[1]
  • Radiation therapy to the wrong body region or 25% above the planned dose.

The clinical laboratory organisation, Dark Daily suggest that this list should also include 'misdiagnosis' and other preventable diagnostic errors.

misdiagnosis

Diagnoses that are missed altogether, wrong, or should have been made much earlier