Mr Ian Sabin, Consultant Neurosurgeon

Barts and the London NHS Trust,

Since 1992 Ian Sabin has been Consultant Neurosurgeon at St Barts and the Royal London NHS Trust and at The Wellington Hospital. He is Director of the London Gamma Knife Centre at St Barts Hospital and Neurosurgical Tutor to the Royal College of Surgeons of England. He is a Member of the Medical Advisory Committee, Harley Street Clinic

He is a past member of the Specialist Advisory Committee for Neurosurgery, and past member of the Court of Examiners, Royal College of Surgeons of England. Ian Sabin is an International member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, North American Skull Base Society.

Mr Ian Sabin's Clinical Interests include skull base surgery (acoustic neuromas, pituitaryA gland deep in the brain that produces several hormones controlling the production of other hormones throughout the body tumours, and trigeminal neuralgiaA disorder of the trigeminal nerve, which supplies sensation to the face.), neuro-oncology, cervicalRelating either to the cervix (the neck of the womb) or to the cervical vertebrae in the neck (cervical spine). spine surgery and Gamma Knife® radiosurgery. He has a research interest in endoscopic minimally invasive neurosurgery.

Articles: 
  • Gamma Knife® FAQs

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    The Gamma Knife® is a machine designed to deliver radiationEnergy in the form of waves or particles, including radio waves, X-rays and gamma rays. in a very precise manner by targeting hundreds of pinpointed beams of radiation directly at the tumourAn abnormal swelling.. This system provides a non-invasiveAny test or technique that does not involve penetration of the skin. The term 'non-invasive' may also describe tumours that do not invade surrounding tissues. and non-surgical treatment for brain conditions.

  • When is treatment with Gamma Knife® radiosurgery appropriate?

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    The Gamma Knife® (GK) is a machine designed to deliver radiationEnergy in the form of waves or particles, including radio waves, X-rays and gamma rays. in a very precise manner, to treat a patient with a single dose over the course of a day rather than in a number of doses over weeks. The early prototype was first used in the late 1960s but was later developed to a model more comparable to today’s machine in the mid-1980s.

  • Gamma Knife® Surgery and Neurosurgery

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    Introduction

    The Leksell Gamma Knife® is used to deliver radiotherapyThe treatment of disease using radiation. with precision to treat a variety of neurological Associated with the nervous system and the brain. problems involving the brain.  Most of the conditions treated are tumours – both benignNot dangerous, usually applied to a tumour that is not malignant. and malignantDescribes a tumour resulting from uncontrolled cell division that can invade other tissues and may spread to distant parts of the body. – but in addition tangles of arteries and veins (arterio-venousRelating to the veins. malformations –AVMs) can be obliterated and the excruciating facial pain known as trigeminal neuralgiaA disorder of the trigeminal nerve, which supplies sensation to the face. can be relieved. 

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