Dr Steve Hyer, Consultant in Endocrinology

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

Dr Steve Hyer is Consultant Endocrinologist at Epsom & St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust (ESTH) and Honorary Consultant at the Royal Marsden Hospital where he is part of a multi-disciplinary team for patients with thyroidA gland in the neck that produces hormones with a role in controlling metabolism. disease. He is also Honorary Senior Lecturer at St George’s Hospital Medical School in London. He is Director of R&D at ESTH and also Clinical Director for Specialty medicine.

Dr Hyer has a long standing interest in all the complications of diabetesA disorder caused by insufficient or absent production of the hormone insulin by the pancreas, or because the tissues are resistant to the effects. and is currently a researcher in a number of studies examining diabetes in pregnancythe period from conception to birth. His MD thesis was on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathyDamage to the retina caused by diabetes. He has made original contributions to the literature on the use of octreotide in proliferative diabetic retinopathy, the relation between diabetic control and glomerular filtration, the distribution of plantar pressure in diabetic neuropathyDamage to or disease of nerves. and the use of metformin in gestational diabetesAny level of glucose intolerance first detected during pregnancy..

Dr Hyer is passionate about ensuring that people with diabetes live full and rewarding lives and don’t allow their diabetes to stop them doing whatever they want to do. “My hero is Steve Redgrave, 5 times Olympic Gold Medallist and arguably our greatest ever athlete. Steve didn’t let treatment with insulinA hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that acts to lower blood glucose levels. stop him from achieving his dreams!”

Articles: 
  • Diabetes and Diagnostics

    By Contact

    Maintaining bloodA fluid that transports oxygen and other substances through the body, made up of blood cells suspended in a liquid. glucoseA simple sugar that is an important source of energy in the body. levels at the optimum level is crucial to health; abnormally high or low glucose sugar levels are dangerous and if very severe can put a person into a coma. The normal healthy body copes with the daily demands by producing higher or lower amounts of insulinA hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that acts to lower blood glucose levels. to either rapidly metaboliseTo break down or process substances in the body. excess sugar, or to reduce the rate at which it is taken from the blood. For people with diabetesA disorder caused by insufficient or absent production of the hormone insulin by the pancreas, or because the tissues are resistant to the effects., this finely controlled feedback mechanism no longer works properly, which is why measuring glucose levels becomes so important.  

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